New Interim Assistant Principal hopes to leave impact despite short time at Algonquin

New+interim+Assistant+Principal+Ron+Sudmyer+poses+in+his+office+on+Friday%2C+Nov.+12.+

Gwen McDougall

New interim Assistant Principal Ron Sudmyer poses in his office on Friday, Nov. 12.

Riya Mahanta, Assistant News Editor

Despite being semi-retired, new Interim Assistant Principal Ron Sudmyer continues to be an active member of Algonquin leadership teams. 

Sudmyer has been retired for many years now after teaching history for 25 years at Framingham High School, but he continues to work as an educator and administrator. He has taken multiple interim positions over the past years, and his resume can be found here.

“I am a person who, although semi-retired from teaching and being an administrator, likes to stay involved with schools, and I feel very comfortable being in schools as I have experience that I can lend to people here [at schools],” Sudmyer said.

He enjoys working as an administrator as he finds it fulfilling. 

“I find it very rewarding to come into a school and help the leadership team move things forward especially now, after what we have been through with the pandemic,” Sudmyer said. 

Although he spends a short time at each school, he still hopes to have an influence within the school.

“Even if I’m only here for one year as an interim, not four years or multiple years where you can really get to know people long-term, the way I plan to make an impact is to come to work everyday trying to help as many people as I can, particularly students, so they can be the best versions of themselves,” Sudmyer said.

Even if I’m only here for one year as an interim, not four years or multiple years where you can really get to know people long-term, the way I plan to make an impact is to come to work everyday trying to help as many people as I can, particularly students, so they can be the best versions of themselves.”

— Ron Sudmyer, Interim Assistant Principal

Sudmyer believes that now, during the pandemic, being an educator can be difficult but worth the challenge.

“I don’t think there has been a more challenging time,” Sudmyer said. “However, I don’t think there has been more of a rewarding time to be an educator because we can really make a difference now in motivating students, getting them back into the mode of learning from others. We can help them with their social and emotional needs, especially  given the number of students over the past year that have had mental health issues.”

Sudmyer has a positive outlook on post-pandemic circumstances. 

“We need healing, we need realistic optimism, and I think when we come out of this [the pandemic] on the other end we are going to be better schools, teachers and people,” Sudmyer said.

According to Sudmyer, teaching is one of the greatest professions in the world.

“If you look at any successful person in the world today and ask them if there was a teacher or coach in their life that made a difference for them, they will be able to name a person right away,” Sudmyer said. “Someone had to teach the doctors, lawyers, corporation heads, athletes and presidents.”

In addition to supporting students, Sudmyer wants to advocate for and help teachers as well.

“Twenty-five years in the classroom as a teacher really prepared me for understanding the nature of the job being in a classroom,” Sudmyer said.  “You can’t forget what it’s like to be a classroom teacher and the support that they need as an administrator.”

For Sudmyer, the most challenging part of being an administrator is connecting with some students.

“The day-to-day challenge is how to find a connection with students who particularly need help,” Sudmyer said. “As an Assistant Principal, a lot of the work you do is with students who are struggling for a variety of reasons.”

So far, Sudmyer enjoys working at Algonquin. 

“I am really impressed with the people here at Algonquin,” Sudmyer said. “The staff has been wonderful, and there is a great leadership team. The students seem to be very happy to be here, and it has been very motivating to get up in the morning to come to Algonquin.”

When he isn’t at school, Sudmyer spends his time relaxing, reading and running.

“I also officiate sports, which I find really fulfilling; I am getting the exercise, I am relating to people on the field, and quite frankly it’s similar to being an administrator at a school,” Sudmyer said.

Sudmyer looks forward to the rest of his year at Algonquin.

“Even though we are still wearing our masks, I still see a lot of smiles, which tells me this is a great place to be,” Sudmyer said.