Day for Change evolves to create larger impact

%5BFrom+front+to+back%5D+senior+Paul+Probst+and+juniors+Julia+Farrell%2C+Maeve+Grandpre+and+Lucy+McGlynn+participate+in+a+game+of+tug+of+war+as+a+part+of+Day+for+Change.+This+year%2C+more+large+group+activities+were+added+in+order+to+create+a+more+lasting+impact+on+freshmen.+
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Day for Change evolves to create larger impact

[From front to back] senior Paul Probst and juniors Julia Farrell, Maeve Grandpre and Lucy McGlynn participate in a game of tug of war as a part of Day for Change. This year, more large group activities were added in order to create a more lasting impact on freshmen.

[From front to back] senior Paul Probst and juniors Julia Farrell, Maeve Grandpre and Lucy McGlynn participate in a game of tug of war as a part of Day for Change. This year, more large group activities were added in order to create a more lasting impact on freshmen.

Jonny Ratner

[From front to back] senior Paul Probst and juniors Julia Farrell, Maeve Grandpre and Lucy McGlynn participate in a game of tug of war as a part of Day for Change. This year, more large group activities were added in order to create a more lasting impact on freshmen.

Jonny Ratner

Jonny Ratner

[From front to back] senior Paul Probst and juniors Julia Farrell, Maeve Grandpre and Lucy McGlynn participate in a game of tug of war as a part of Day for Change. This year, more large group activities were added in order to create a more lasting impact on freshmen.

Liza Armstrong, Online Editor

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On Nov. 21, the annual Day for Change, an event for freshmen to bond with their classmates through shared experiences, took place in the gymnasiums. 

This year, the most notable change consisted of having student facilitators rather than guidance counselors lead the freshmen. According to Head of Guidance Lisa Connery, having students lead Day for Change will make the event more impactful for freshmen and guidance will continue to find more ways to use students as leaders.

However, some peer mentors and freshman participants believed that these changes did not bring anything more to the event.

“I honestly don’t think there [was] much change, unfortunately,” peer mentor and senior Ameena Syed said. “…I felt like our apologies [an activity where students can go up and apologize to someone in front of the whole group] were pretty serious [compared to this year].”

“We will be collaborating with teachers and mentors to gather feedback and ideas for changes to next year’s program,” Connery said in an email. “We have teachers and students who regularly attend leadership conferences. We would like to hear about team building activities they’ve engaged in or experienced to determine if we should make changes to the DFC activities.”