News Senior Staff Writer Mia Nicosia argues that food deliveries to ARHS are dangerous, while Assistant Opinion Editor Cass Melo advocates that deliveries can encourage students to stay on campus.
News Senior Staff Writer Mia Nicosia argues that food deliveries to ARHS are dangerous, while Assistant Opinion Editor Cass Melo advocates that deliveries can encourage students to stay on campus.
Ellie O’Connor

The Great Debate: Should food deliveries be allowed at Algonquin?

No, Algonquin shouldn’t allow food deliveries for students
Mia Nicosia, News Senior Staff Writer

There’s a stranger waiting at the H200 door. Are they a threat to school safety? Possibly. Has another student broken the rules and got a Doordash delivery because they’re desperate for burritos or iced lattes during D Block? Probably. Why take the risk?

Though food deliveries to school are efficient and everyone would like to have a treat during the day, they can be dangerous and shouldn’t be allowed. Despite the warnings from teachers and faculty that deliveries are not allowed, students continue to order food to school. Administration, along with Student Council, have made a massive effort to make sure students’ voices and concerns are heard and although many students would like to be able to have food delivered, not everything is possible for the school to change, and food deliveries is one of those items. 

Although it may seem harmless, fast food deliveries are a major safety risk to students. When food is ordered and delivered, complete strangers are openly welcomed onto the school campus. Students and community members want to have a safe, secure campus, and in a time where school shootings are a major concern, it’s important to limit the amount of unmonitored visitors on school grounds. 

Not only are food deliveries a potential safety hazard, but they are also distracting to students and faculty around the building. Students walking in and out of classrooms to grab the ordered food, and both office administration and teachers having to deal with the students and the food delivery person takes away valuable class time.

As well as causing distractions, the school can’t sanction food deliveries because the district has governmental rules and regulations it must abide by concerning the nutritional value of food that is sold and purchased on campus. It also can be frustrating to the cafeteria staff who spend several hours a day cooking and preparing different food options for students with allergies and food preferences, as well as attempting to promote a cultural variety. They make sure students eat healthy and filling portions that fit in the government required school lunch, which supports students’ growth. We are all provided with free breakfast and free lunch, so it’s not necessary to order from local restaurants.

Administrators have made an effort to prevent students from ordering food deliveries from off campus by not only putting up posters around the school and online, but also by giving verbal warnings when students are caught in the act. When students are given more than one warning, eventually the food will be taken from them, which is a reasonable response. 

Though it may be frustrating to students, there is a way around the no food delivery rule. Students are welcome to bring food from home, or order it and pick it up before school. Seniors also have senior privileges, which allow them to leave school campus during the school day and grab food from a place of their choice and convenience (although they, too, are not supposed to bring the food they purchase into the building when they return).

Administrators have the duty to continue to make an effort to prevent food deliveries, especially when it affects students’ safety. We, as students, have the duty to follow the rule, even if we find it frustrating, and to save the deliveries for at home and after school hours.

Yes, Algonquin should allow students’ food deliveries
Cass Melo, Assistant Opinion Editor

Despite numerous warnings from administration, some students continue to order food to be delivered to school. Whether it’s coffee or lunch, these deliveries are inevitable, and the administration should work with students to regulate the process. 

In today’s fast-paced society, convenience and efficiency have become essential aspects of students’ daily lives. Students have busy and demanding schedules, and access to food deliveries through services such as DoorDash and Uber Eats can significantly enhance their productivity and time management, while supporting their growth and development. 

Preventing students from delivering items to school during the day creates a series of other problems. For students who can drive, many leave school during lunch or even skip classes to pick up food for themselves. Those who ignore warnings and continue to get food delivered then create a safety hazard for other students, as they attempt to avoid punishment by not alerting the school of the potential threat. Additionally, allowing food deliveries would encourage students to remain on school property throughout the day, and in turn, stay safe as they would be on the road for less time. 

For students who rely on the bus or have extracurriculars early in the mornings, packing a lunch before school can be challenging. Allowing food deliveries to school helps overcome this obstacle by ensuring that students have access to meals without having to leave campus. 

Additionally, allowing students to have food delivered encourages them to make conscious choices about their meals and develop a healthy relationship with food by selecting balanced and nourishing options. Ordering food requires students to navigate online platforms, practice budgeting, and make responsible decisions, all of which are valuable life skills that they can carry forward into adulthood.

Furthermore, delivery services offer a wide array of options such as accommodating various dietary needs. While the school offers meals which align with many preferences and restrictions, food delivery allows for a wider variety of vegetarian, vegan, gluten-free or allergy-friendly options which promotes inclusivity by supplying students with nutritious meals tailored to their specific needs.

Food delivery services also promote inclusivity, as they provide options for students with diverse cultural backgrounds, ensuring that all students can enjoy meals that align with their cultural preferences and traditions.

Permitting food deliveries to high schools not only benefits students, but also supports local businesses. Many food delivery services collaborate with nearby restaurants and establishments, generating revenue for these businesses. By allowing students to order from these services, schools contribute to the local economy and encourage entrepreneurship, ultimately fostering a sense of community.

As all school deliveries are placed in the front of the rotunda, ensuring students who order food deliveries are given proper information to the services about where to leave the items should not cause an additional strain on administration. If students communicate with administration about their purchases and are prepared to receive them safely without disrupting learning time, schools can empower students to make informed choices while prioritizing their overall well-being and academic success.

 


 

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About the Contributors
Mia Nicosia, News Senior Staff Writer
I took Journalism my freshman year to be more interactive around the school. I enjoy writing and learning interesting facts about people during the interviews I conduct as a senior staff writer. During my free time I am a part of a junior competitive riflery league and archery team. Also for the school I am apart of sophomore steering, CAP, and am a Workshop leader and Outreach coordinator for ADL (Anti-defamation league)
Cass Melo, Assistant Opinion Editor
Ellie O’Connor, Online Editor
Ellie has been writing for the Harbinger ever since taking journalism in her sophomore year. Currently, as Online Editor, Ellie hopes to continue learning more and gaining experience in the club. Outside of the Harbinger, she runs cross country and track, enjoys reading, and hanging out with friends.
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